Old sayings and traditions.

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Old sayings and traditions.

Post by wayland on Fri Dec 29, 2017 4:01 pm

I luv to hear those old sayings given down to us by the "Old Folk". There is usually wisdom in such words and traditions. Any of you lads got some gems to post here ?
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wayland

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Re: Old sayings and traditions.

Post by Sean Ph'lib on Sat Dec 30, 2017 2:00 am

I have a few, Wayland, but they're mostly in old Irish. My mother learned them from her mother and she passed them on to me. Like:
"Geal leis an Fíach dubh a gearrcach féin!" It means that the raven considers her nestling to be beautiful (and if you've ever seen a nestling raven you'll know that there are few uglier creatures!) The implication is that, in a mother's eyes, her child - no matter how ugly - is beautiful and can do no wrong. So, the next time you hear some parent praising his or her offspring - whom you consider unworthy of such praise - you may reply: "geal leis an Fíach dubh a gearrcach féin!"

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Re: Old sayings and traditions.

Post by wayland on Sun Dec 31, 2017 11:53 am

Thanks for that Sean. Perhaps you could reprint that in finetics for those like me who struggle with the Irish language. I could use it in the pub which I am sure would stop the locals dead in their tracks.Very Happy I have a bit of old Gloucestershire dialect to share:- Ower bist ol butt, and Scots:-Lang ma yer lum reek. For those who harvest Walnuts:- A dog, a woman, a Walnut tree, the more yer bet the better they be! Not that I would endorse the latter of course.
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Re: Old sayings and traditions.

Post by Sean Ph'lib on Sun Dec 31, 2017 5:35 pm

English phonetics would be something like: "Gal lesh un feeak duv a garcock fayn!" Sad to say, many modern day Irish speakers -particularly the younger ones - won't know the words for "raven" (Fíach dubh) or "nestling" (gearrcach).

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Re: Old sayings and traditions.

Post by Sean Ph'lib on Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:33 pm

Here's another one for you Wayland :
Ní hé lá na gaoithe lá na scolb.
Literally : The day of the wind is not the day of the spars.
It harks back to the days when every farmer or smallholder would thatch his own reeks of hay, oats and indeed his dwelling-house. At some stage during the year, you would have to give a day cutting and preparing spars (from hazel or sally) to secure the thatch. The wise man would have them ready well in advance of the windy winter days. No good running around trying to prepare them when the storm is tearing off the thatch! Of course the saying lends itself to all walks of life. It's like the boy scouts: "Be prepared!"

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Re: Old sayings and traditions.

Post by wayland on Fri Jan 05, 2018 5:51 pm

That brings back memories Sean. My people come from north Norfolk and as a young fella we were taken into the hay fields and picnicked while the adults made the rectangular Ricks. With their thatched roofs they looked like little cots. This would be in the early 50`s. What a memory. I have little idea what happened last week though. pale pale
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Birds of a feather...

Post by Sean Ph'lib on Sat Jan 06, 2018 2:45 pm

See if this one will trip off your tongue Wayland - it's a rather more cutting version of the English "Birds of a feather flock together".
"Aithníonn ciaróg ciaróg eile"
English phonetics: "Aha-neeun keea-rogue keea-rogue ella"
It means: "One cockroach recognises another cockroach!"
You can use this in your local when you spot a pair of disreputable characters in company together. pirat

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Re: Old sayings and traditions.

Post by wayland on Sat Jan 06, 2018 3:17 pm

That one I can do-ish!. As to traditions . Today is"Straw bear" day in"Whittlesey" Cambs. This very welcome winter festival`s origins are steeped in the past. We would attend this all day pub crawl every year when people took over the town from cars etc. Lots of morris and molly as well as ladies clog dancers would make their way around the many pubs. The Straw Bear was a local lad thatched completely in straw and led around by a "Handler" in front of the pression. He would mimic a dancing bear. He would be burned the next day. I guess they got the lad out first.
http://www.strawbear.org.uk/
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Re: Old sayings and traditions.

Post by wayland on Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:31 am

Ref seed germination in the past. :- Four seeds in a hole. One for the Rook, one for the Crow, one to rot, and one to grow.
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